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Posts Tagged ‘God’

A Korea movie, “Secret sunshine,” (Directed by Chang-Dong Lee, who was the Minister of Culture in Korea, this movie won the best actress award in Cannes Film Festival 2007),
shows us a relationship between the responsibility for others and absolute faith to God. After her husband’s death, Sine goes to his hometown to live there with her son. She opens a piano institution. One day, her son is kidnapped and dies. One of the neighbors delivers God’s good news to her, so that she attends Sunday worship service, believes in God, and becomes a Christian. As time goes by, she wants to forgive the killer, so she goes to the prison to forgive him. She delivers God’s good news to him, but she finds that he also believes in God there. He says, “I am very happy to believe in God, because God already forgave me. So I pray every morning and evening. I also pray for you and will pray for you in my life.” In this case, most Christians usually must be happy and praise God because they also believe in God who changes the killer. However, she is shocked because God already forgave him before she did. She cannot understand it. She asks how God could forgive him without her permission or forgiveness, because it was her son who died.
However, is her response also proper? We must also ask with regard to the dead son: “Who really died?” It was the son, not the mother, who died. If so, is it appropriate for the mother to forgive before the dead son forgives the killer? Does she really have authority to forgive the murderer? Who has that authority? The son really has the authority to forgive the murderer, but he died. In this case who can have authority? Does God alone not have that authority? Since Jesus dies all human beings’ death including her son’s death itself, God can have the authority of forgiveness. To that extent, then, is the dead son only her son? Is he not also God’s son? If the son is also God’s child and she does not have the real right to forgive the killer, then is God’s forgiveness not possible?

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“A church of whatever size or structure… will openly acknowledge the legitimate presence of doubters and seekers, not just at the margins but at the center of its religious life. But at the same time, it will not shy away from affirming the reality and goodness of God, the holiness of God’s creation, or the hope of fulfillment for those whose lives are blighted by the ravages of nature or of other human beings. And it will continue to offer—as an object of belief for some, a hoped-for possibility for others—the bold but at the same time modest offer of a connection to the one who, it proclaims, made present among us the infinite grace and compassion of the ultimate reality itself.” (Philip Clayton and Steven Knapp, “The Predicament of Belief,” 154).

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“Often times when I meet atheists and we talk about the god they don’t believe in, we quickly discover that I don’t believe in that god either” (Rob Bell, “Love Wins, 9).

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“Jesus replied, ‘Let it be so now; it is proper for us to do this to fulfill all righteousness.’ Then John consented.” (Matthew 3:15)
Although God can do everything God wants and wills, God does not use God’s own authority to fulfill all righteousness but begs baptism from a man John. This reminds me of God’s kenosis or God’s self-emptying from Philippians 2. This image of Jesus may be different from Jesus we make in the fossilized doctrine. The fact that Jesus was baptized by a man John does not mean that the authority of the earth dominates that of the heaven but that through the apostolic tradition or spirit of the earth God fulfills the vision or will of the heaven, declaring that “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.” What we learn from baptism, God meets and works with the world together.

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“God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)
1) God first loves the world and the world is loved by God.
2) God gives his son and the world receives him.
3) There must be God’s initiative for the world in that the direction is from God to the world: Godthe world.
4) Then, the world returns to God its response (belief) and God receives it: The worldGod.
5) In this logic, we can see mutual relationship (connection): Godthe world.
6) This mutual relation makes it possible to have eternal life.
7) If this mutual relation is broken, eternal life cannot be given. There must be only perishing.

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Is there any mom who asks cost (money) or something from her baby, because she got pregnant for ten months and finally gave birth to the baby?

Does God ask money or something from us, because Jesus took the cross and finally saved us?

It’s time to think about mom’s love and God’s love.

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Christianity and North Korea
Christianity and North Korea in many senses seem not to become friends, because they poignantly criticize each other. On the one hand, Christianity blames aspects of community society of North Korea, aspects that they do not believe in God but believe in Jungil Kim who has taken place of God and who attempts to hand his throne over to his son. On the other hand, North Korea criticizes Christianity which makes people ignore concretely current realities. However, ironically, they entail the opposite aspects in that whereas some senior pastors in Christianity would like to hand their position to their sons, Jungil Kim wants to be a God. They have common grounds in adjectives: exclusive, isolated, and arrogant. Unless both of them have open minds to other religions and countries, and are humble, do you think that they future is promising?

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