Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Panentheism’ Category

Jesus’ Life

the trace of Jesus’ life could be the image of “W” which has five points: The Son (in the Triune God)  The Cross  The Resurrection  Galilee  Ascension. If one cuts horizontally the middle part from the bottom, it means to accept dualism. If one accepts just the bottom parts (the Cross and Galilee), it means to accept God’s immanence or God’s self-limitation alone. If one accepts just the upper parts (the Son in the Triune God, the resurrection, and ascension), it means to accept God’s ascension, or God’s self-unlimitation alone. Thus we need to see this picture as a whole. If one cuts vertically at any part, it cannot express the succession of Jesus’ life.

Read Full Post »

Like the Law of Gravity, love is also flowing from God to the world. However, in order to achieve ultimate love between God and the world, love needs to break the law of gravity. That is, love of the world must go up to God. In this sense, whereas classical theism follows the law of gravity of love, panentheism breaks the law.

Read Full Post »

“Jesus replied, ‘Let it be so now; it is proper for us to do this to fulfill all righteousness.’ Then John consented.” (Matthew 3:15)
Although God can do everything God wants and wills, God does not use God’s own authority to fulfill all righteousness but begs baptism from a man John. This reminds me of God’s kenosis or God’s self-emptying from Philippians 2. This image of Jesus may be different from Jesus we make in the fossilized doctrine. The fact that Jesus was baptized by a man John does not mean that the authority of the earth dominates that of the heaven but that through the apostolic tradition or spirit of the earth God fulfills the vision or will of the heaven, declaring that “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.” What we learn from baptism, God meets and works with the world together.

Read Full Post »

“God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)
1) God first loves the world and the world is loved by God.
2) God gives his son and the world receives him.
3) There must be God’s initiative for the world in that the direction is from God to the world: Godthe world.
4) Then, the world returns to God its response (belief) and God receives it: The worldGod.
5) In this logic, we can see mutual relationship (connection): Godthe world.
6) This mutual relation makes it possible to have eternal life.
7) If this mutual relation is broken, eternal life cannot be given. There must be only perishing.

Read Full Post »

Kenotic Christology (Philippians 2:5) can be expanded into the Kenotic life (Romans 12:2): “Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will.”

Read Full Post »

We human beings have limited remembrance. Although we attempt to meticulously record all human history, we cannot perfectly keep them. However, all history, whether it is that of individual person, that of a country, or that of the cosmos, must be completely preserved. Then, who can do it? Isn’t it possible only for God? Without God, who can remember the history of all existences? Although an existence is even a small microorganism, if it is not remembered, isn’t it too much sad? Thus, as Whitehead maintains, there must be no negative prehension in God. Thus God must exist.

Read Full Post »

If God is omnipotent, the impossible for God must be also possible.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »