Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2012

. “Holy Discontent”
Bass considers discontent as a gift, because it is “the beginning of change.” That is, “Discontent is one short step from the longing for a better life, a better society, and a better world; and longing is another short step from doing something about what is wrong. Indeed, restlessness possesses a spiritual quality: ‘Blessed are the poor in spirit,’ said Jesus, ‘for theirs is the kingdom of heaven’ (Matt. 5:3).” (Diana Bass, “Christianity after Religion,” 84)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Church Business?
“The religious model that once worked so well serving to educate, spiritually enliven, and socially elevate so many does not accomplish those goals as well any longer…. [C]hurch executives became too distanced from the regular folks; managers (i.e., pastors) grumbled about pay, benefits, and working conditions; creativity was strangled by red tape; expenses began to outrun income; and huge facilities needed to be maintained. Faith increasingly became a commodity and membership roles and money the measures of success. The business of the church replaced the mission of the church. Slowly, then more quickly, customers became disgruntled. Resources declined. (Diana Bass, “Christianity after Religion,” 72).

Read Full Post »

Nowadays we can hear often an expression, “spiritual but not religious.” It means that people are not satisfied with institutional religions any more but in finding “a new way of connecting with God.” (Diana Bass, “Christianity after Religion,” 68).

Read Full Post »

“Religion, faith, spiritual experience, mysticism, church, theology—all these are holy things, profound ways of relating to God. Yet they all exist in the context of the world, equally as dependent on the vicissitudes of human experience as any surety of divine revelation. Religious expression is not immutable; it changes all the time. Faith roils right along with other global pressures. Christianity is no exception to the historical transformation of our times, and to view faith as either irrelevant to or outside of the purview of global cultural change is foolish.” (Diana Bass, “Christianity after Religion,” 7).

Read Full Post »